Objectives

to work with parents and clinicians to identify uncertainties about stillbirth to agree a prioritised list of those uncertainties for research to publicise the results of the PSP to take the results to research commissioning bodies to be considered for funding

The Stillbirth Priority

Setting Partnership is

funded by Tommy’s – the

baby charity. Click the logo

below to view or download

their document describing

the PSP partnership and

the results.

Home Introduction Survey News Steering Group Stakeholders FAQS Contact
The Stillbirth Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) The Stillbirth PSP aims to help parents and clinicians work together to agree which are the most important questions which still need to be answered by stillbirth research. We hope this will help direct research and address existing gaps in understanding stillbirth for both parents and those who care for them. The idea of a Stillbirth PSP was originally explored as part of a programme of work investigating whether increased awareness and better management of reduced fetal movements was able to reduce stillbirth. Following a preliminary meeting of stakeholders held in Manchester in December 2012, it was decided to broaden the scope of the PSP to late stillbirth. The readiness questionnaire was submitted to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (NETSCC) in April 2013 and the PSP topic was accepted subject to funding which was confirmed in Autumn 2013, enabling the steering group to meet in November 2013. Since then the steering group have developed and piloted the survey to identify unanswered questions in stillbirth and engaged over 20 additional stakeholder organisations. More information about the project timeline can be found in the FAQs section. The initial survey closed in July 2014. We have grouped the suggestions we received from this first survey into a shorter list of summary questions, and tried to identify the most important ones based on the number of people suggesting them and the ones that were suggested by both parents and professionals. We now need parents, professionals and anyone affected by stillbirth to help us to further prioritise the shortlist of 40 questions in this this survey, by telling us the ten unanswered questions about stillbirth that are most important to them on the Survey page. We will take the results of this second survey to a workshop on 2nd February 2015 where parents and professionals will work together to agree the 'top ten' questions in stillbirth research that desperately need answering.  
© 2014 stillbirthpsp Privacy Terms of Use Design by Technology Framework
Introduction